In Georgia, the law provides specific guidelines as to how a horse is to be cared for. The exact person providing care for your animal in your absence is not restricted, however, it is required that they are able to meet the rules set out by state law.

Per the Georgia Codes, failure to do so could result in your horse being impounded, which means that it will be placed in the temporary care of an appropriate caregiver appointed by the state. If the state is unable to contact you or receive a response regarding your impounded horse, then the animal will be sold, or if its state is such that euthanasia is deemed the only reasonable option, it could be put down.

What are the requirements for proper horse care?

 As long as your horse’s caregiver follows the rules required by the state, you should be able to leave your animal without worry. The horse’s caregiver may not beat, torment, overdrive or overload your horse at any point while supervising the animal’s care.

The horse must always be able to receive humane care. The animal must also continuously have access to adequate food and water, which the state defines as an amount that allows the horse to avoid significant health risks, and will keep the animal from becoming dehydrated or starving.

Otherwise, your horse is also protected by the more general state law that prohibits cruelty to animals. Make sure you and your horse’s caregiver are both informed about Code Section 16-12-4, which describes the rules regarding cruelty to animals.

This is an informative article that should not be thought of as legal advice.